Oral Cancer

Oral Cancer Pathophysiology The term oral cancer includes cancers of the mouth and the pharynx. Several types of tissue make up the mouth and oropharynx. Most cases of oral cancer are because of cigarette smoking, heavy alcohol use or the use of both tobacco and alcohol consumptions. The stage of oral cancer is one of the most important factors in evaluating treatment options. A stage I oral cancer tumour means the primary tumour is 2 cm across or smaller and no cancer cells are present in nearby structures, lymph nodes or distant sites. A stage II oral tumour measures 2–4 cm across and no cancer cells are present in nearby structures, lymph nodes or distant sites. The oral tumour is larger than 4 cm across and no cancer cells are present in nearby structures, lymph nodes or distant sites is stage III. Stage IV is the tumour has invaded deeper areas and/or tissues. Depending on the stage of Oral Cancer the type of surgery is recommended. Tumour resection is an operation to remove the entire tumour. Some normal tissue surrounding the tumour is also removed to ensure that no cancer cells remain in the body.

  • Oral Epidemiology and Risk Factors
  • Molecular Pathogenesis of Oral cancer
  • Chemotherapy of oral cancer and its side effects
  • Tobacco and oral diseases